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Newsroom

  • CBIA Report: CBIA NAMES AMY GLAD INTERIM CEO

    The California Building Industry Association has named Amy Glad as Interim CEO. A respected industry leader, she was the first woman to serve as Chair of CBIA in 2013.  Equally important, Amy has extensive homebuilding and public policy experience. Amy has over 35 years of public agency, trade association and real estate development experience. She was Senior Vice President of Governmental Affairs at Pardee Homes where she primarily managed federal and state land entitlements for master-planned communities.

  • LA Weekly: Will There Be a Dramatic Slowdown in the Construction of L.A. Housing?

    Construction cranes dot the Hollywood skyline. But is a slowdown coming?During the first half of this decade, Los Angeles gained more than 230,000 residents — and just 40,000 new housing units. That exacerbated an already festering housing crisis, which has made L.A. among the least affordable cities in the country. Recently, there have been signs of green shoots. Construction cranes dot the skylines of Hollywood and downtown. And statewide, more new housing units were built last year than in any recent year. But that progress may be about to stall in Los Angeles. A report by the Building Industry Association of Southern California, or BIA, says that applications for new housing units in Los Angeles have fallen dramatically this year. Tim Piasky, the head of BIA’s Los Angeles chapter, says the main reason for the decrease is Proposition JJJ, which was passed by L.A. voters in November 2016. “You’ve taken a housing crisis we had, pre-KJJ, and you’ve made it worse,” Piasky says.

     

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  • Modesto Bee: Calling out Adam Gray to get onboard for building more affordable housing

    California is facing the worst housing crisis in its history and the effects are being felt in the San Joaquin Valley, where residents earning local wages are being priced out of communities in which their families have lived for generations. The National Low-Income Housing Coalition says the hourly wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment in Stanislaus County is $18.04 per hour, but area renters average only $13.64 per hour in pay. Families are having to double up or live in substandard housing due to high housing costs, which affects the health, education and well-being of children and workers. Homelessness is on the rise.

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  • KPCC: HUD estimates half a million low-income LA renters at risk of losing homes

    119775 fullRoughly 567,000 people living in Los Angeles are poor renters who can’t access the government assistance they qualify for and are in danger of falling into homelessness, according to a new report from the U.S. Department Housing and Urban Development. The report said these renters have “worst case needs” — they make so little money they could get public housing or rental assistance but there’s not enough government help to go around. Southern California’s housing affordability crisis is far-reaching, but low-income renters may be among the hardest hit. And those living in Los Angeles are not alone. In the Riverside metropolitan area, poor renters with no government assistance number about 123,000.
  • Housing Wire: Few California home shoppers can afford average-priced homes

    Los AngelesCalifornia’s infamous housing situation isn’t getting any better, with the number of people that can afford that Golden State’s averaged-priced home dropping even lower. According the California Association of Realtors’ Traditional Housing Affordability Index, only 29% of California households could afford to purchase the $553,260 median-priced home in the second quarter of 2017. This is down from 32% in first-quarter 2017 and down from 31% in second-quarter 2016. The drop also marks the 17th consecutive quarter that the index has been below 40% and the lowest since third-quarter 2015.

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  • LA Daily News: Trim the thicket of hindrances to housing construction

    Homes are under construction in Azusa in this December 2012 file photo.  (Southern Calfornia News Group)Legislative leaders have promised to tackle housing affordability when they return to session later this month. They need to make a concerted, successful effort to relieve some of the regulations that enable not-in-my-backyard-ism and stymie housing construction — and not just pile on more taxes. Even some Democrats have lost their stomach for new taxes or tax increases after passage of the gas-tax package and the cap-and-trade deal. California leaders may need to divert some revenue to affordable-housing efforts but, more important, they need to stop what’s stopping the construction of housing, affordable and otherwise.

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  • Sat PR News: Poll Reveals Strong Support for Large Affordable Housing Bond

    Amid Californians’ mounting concern over rising homelessness and out-of-reach rents, California State Treasurer John Chiang and a coalition of affordable housing advocates have released the results of a new poll, which shows strong voter support for a $6-9 billion statewide affordable housing bond in 2018. Today in California, more than 1 in 3 families can’t afford their rent and 1.5 households pay more than half their income toward housing. The poll, conducted by JMM Research for Advocates for Affordable Housing, found that the electorate is attuned to the state’s housing problems, with 60% of likely November 2018 voters supporting a $6 billion to $9 billion statewide affordable housing bond.

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  • StreetsBlogLA: Community Land Trusts: An Overlooked Model for L.A. Housing Affordability

    Much of California faces a serious housing crisis. For both renters and owners, L.A. housing is among the least affordable in the United States. For working families, the lack of affordable housing can mean unreasonable rents, displacement, and even homelessness. While there are numerous community groups building new affordable housing, new supply is nowhere near enough to meet demand. Most affordable housing in Southern California is not permanent, but features covenant restrictions that last for several decades, then expire.

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  • Enterprise: Senate Finance Committee Holds Hearing on Affordable Housing

    US Capitol

    Today the Senate Finance Committee held a hearing on “America’s Affordable Housing Crisis: Challenges and Solutions.” In a bipartisan show of support for affordable housing, members of the Committee from both sides of the aisle acknowledged the need for more affordable housing and the role of the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (Housing Credit) as our nation’s primary tool for increasing the supply of affordable rental housing.

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  • Ventura County Star: Another state bill that would worsen housing crisis

    Affordable housing 3Assembly Bill 1701 is such an example that will needlessly escalate costly litigation, create a cottage industry for trial attorneys to target homebuilders and depress the housing stock the state desperately needs.  When a new housing project gets underway, general contractors often hire and pay subcontractors to complete such critical components of the project like plumbing, electrical and framing work.

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